If you think vision boards are outrageous, then well, keep following my experiments on HighLifer. But I believe they work. This goes past what I have personally

Creating a sacred space that displays what you want actually does bring it to life. Here’s the actual concept: what we focus on expands. And just like the Bible says, as a man thinks in his heart, so is he.  When you create a vision board and place it in a space where you see it often, you essentially end up doing short visualization exercises throughout the day.

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Visualization is one of the most powerful mind exercises you can do. 

Whether you believe that or not, it has worked for me in different levels.

I read once that Olympic athletes have been using it for decades to improve performance, and Psychology Today reported that the brain patterns activated when a weightlifter lifts heavy weights are also similarly activated when the lifter just imagined (visualized) lifting weights.

So, what’s the big secret to creating a vision board that works? It’s simple: Your vision board should focus on how you want to feel, not just on things that you want. Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to include the material stuff, too. However, the more your board focuses on how you want to feel, the more it will come to life.

However, the more your board focuses on how you want to feel, the more it will come to life.

I  have a few items from past events that I want to keep occurring each year, like a photo of me on a yacht on a vacation I had with my mum in Kenya about 4 years ago. I want to continue to enjoy vacations like this with my family. I’ve gone on a few since then and will be reliving this experience this year. I have a few quotes and reminders around them to make me remember what I want to achieve.

I also have a black passageway that I painted black so I can write words of encouragement and also words that resonate with core manifestation of who I am.

There is only one major rule to creating a vision board that works, and it’s that there aren’t any rules. There’s never been any real guide to how to or not to create a vision board as long as you ascertain that it captures what you want to achieve in the future as well as when

There is only one major rule to creating a vision board that works, and it’s that there aren’t any rules.

What you’ll need:

  • Any kind of board, if you’re new maybe start with a cork board or poster board from the hardware store, they run about a dollar. If you can, I recommend a pin board or something pretty you like to look at — I got my 24×24” white wood framed pin board on Etsy.
  • Scissors, tape, pins, and/or a glue-stick to put your board together.
  • If you want, fun markers, stickers, or anything else you can think of to deck out your board. I don’t use that stuff, but if embellishments make you feel great, then go for it.
  • Magazines that you can cut images and quotes from.
  • Most importantly, the stuff you want to look at every day. Photos, quotes, sayings, images of places you want to go, reminders of events, places, or people, postcards from friends and just about anything that will inspire you.
  • Time. Give yourself a stress-free hour or two to put your board together. If you’re a social butterfly, invite you friends over and make a party out of it. I host a vision board party every year on the first night of my partner mastermind weekend and I can’t even tell you how much it sets the tone for the event — everyone is more focused and less stressed after we do it.

Visual boards have become an important part of my Sunday course correction, my wallpapers, and my studio poster. They are fun and eventually they help you ask the question of what you really want with life. Try it and see if you won’t ask yourself this question.